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Hypertension Nursing Teaching

Hypertension Nursing Teaching

Hypertension is a silent killer. It has several classifications and can be caused by stress or diet changes. Secondary hypertension is caused by disease, whereas primary hypertension may be caused by stress or diet changes. Hypertensive urgency may cause headache, dizziness, shortness of breath, nausea or vomiting. Acute hypertensive crisis may be a hypertensive emergency because there are no symptoms associated with it as in hypertensive urgency.

Hypertension is also known as high blood pressure

Hypertension is a silent killer. It can lead to stroke, heart attack, and kidney failure. Hypertension is a chronic disease and a risk factor for many other diseases including heart attacks and stroke, chronic renal disease (kidney disease), coronary artery disease (CAD), peripheral vascular disease (PVD) among others.

  • The treatment of hypertension with drugs should be done under doctor’s guidance.

The systolic is the first number and represents the maximum pressure of contraction.

The systolic pressure is the first number in a blood pressure reading. It represents the maximum pressure of contraction of your heart muscle, or systole. This occurs when your heart beats and pumps blood through your body.

Diastolic pressure represents relaxation of the ventricles

Diastolic pressure represents relaxation of the ventricles. It is the lower number on the blood pressure reading. When diastolic pressure is greater than 90, it is considered to be high and may indicate that you have hypertension.

Hypertension is classified by systolic and diastolic pressures.

Hypertension is classified by systolic and diastolic pressures. Systolic pressure is the maximum pressure in the arteries, while diastolic pressure is the minimum pressure in the arteries. Both are measured in millimeters of mercury (mmHg).

The first number represents systolic blood pressure and represents how much your artery walls stretch to fill with blood. The second number, or diastolic blood pressure, shows how much your artery walls relax between beats or heartbeats. For example: 120/80 mmHg = 120 mmHg at systole; 80 mmHg at diastole

Primary Hypertension can be caused by stress or diet changes.

The following factors can cause or contribute to primary hypertension:

  • Stress.
  • Diet changes.
  • Family history.
  • Hormonal changes, such as those that occur during pregnancy, menopause and puberty.
  • Medications (including birth control pills).

It’s important to note that not all people with these risk factors will develop high blood pressure. However, if you have one or more of them, it’s important for you to monitor your blood pressure closely over time so that you can take steps—like losing weight or quitting smoking—to lower your risk for developing high blood pressure in the future.

Secondary hypertension is caused by disease.

Other conditions that can cause secondary hypertension include:

  • Chronic kidney disease
  • Pregnancy (due to increased blood volume)
  • Thyroid disease, especially hyperthyroidism. This condition occurs when the thyroid gland produces too much of the hormone thyroxine (which causes an increase in the body’s metabolic rate). It results in symptoms including weight loss, fatigue and tachycardia. Hyperthyroidism can also contribute to high blood pressure by producing excessive amounts of adrenaline and noradrenaline that raise heart rate and force constriction of small arteries throughout the body. In addition to its effects on heart function, excess norepinephrine contributes to increased sodium reabsorption at the kidneys’ collecting ducts resulting in sodium retention within cells which increases blood volume; however it is unclear how this leads directly to high BP.

Hypertensive urgency may cause headache, dizziness, shortness of breath, nausea, or vomiting.

Hypertensive urgency is a type of hypertension that is not as severe as hypertensive emergency. It occurs when the blood pressure rises quickly, but it does not cause any major damage to the body. Hypertension can be caused by dehydration, stress, or eating too much salt. Symptoms include headache, dizziness, shortness of breath, nausea and vomiting.

Acute Hypertensive Crisis may be a hypertensive emergency. Many times the patient does not experience symptoms as in hypertensive urgency.

Acute Hypertensive Crisis may be a hypertensive emergency. Many times the patient does not experience symptoms as in hypertensive urgency.

  • Symptoms:
  • Headache
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Blurred vision or diplopia (double vision)
  • Confusion and disorientation
  • Seizures and coma (rare)

Hypertension is a silent killer. It has several classifications.

Hypertension is a silent killer. It has several classifications, as follows:

  • Primary hypertension
  • Secondary hypertension
  • Congenital or structural causes of hypertension (e.g., kidney disorders)
  • Hypovolemic or hypoplastic causes of hypertension (e.g., dehydration, excessive heat loss)

Some medical conditions that can cause secondary hypertension include the following:

  • Renal artery stenosis (narrowing of the blood vessels supplying your kidneys) * Renal artery thrombosis (blood clot in one or both arteries to your kidneys) * Polycystic kidney disease (a genetic disorder that causes numerous cysts to grow throughout both kidneys)

Hypertension affects about one out of every three Americans and has many complications associated with it:

In conclusion, hypertension is a silent killer. It has several classifications and can be caused by stress or diet changes. Treatment of hypertension includes lowering the blood pressure with medications and lifestyle changes such as exercising regularly and eating healthy foods.