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Nursing Florence Nightingale

Nursing Florence Nightingale

Florence Nightingale was born on May 12, 1820 in Florence Italy. Her parents were wealthy and wanted her to grow up to be a lady. Florence Nightingale spent much of her youth traveling around Europe and Egypt with her family. Despite her parents wishes, she was determined to study nursing. In 1850, she became the superintendent of a hospital called the Institution for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen in Distressed Circumstances. In 1853, she received a letter from a woman asking for help in setting up a nursing school at London Hospital. She developed a training program for nurses that included medical training as well as religious instruction . At the age of 38, she went to Crimea during the Crimean War as a nurse and ended up saving lives . After returning from Crimea she wrote about her experience and made suggestions for changes that needed to be made in understanding what patients needed and how they could be cared for more efficiently While staying at home after Crimea , she wrote books about public health , hospitals , and nursing

Florence Nightingale was born on May 12, 1820 in Florence Italy.

Born on May 12, 1820 in Florence Italy, Florence Nightingale was the daughter of wealthy parents. She grew up learning how to read and write at a young age. Her mother wanted her to be a lady.

Her parents were wealthy and wanted her to grow up to be a lady.

Florence Nightingale was born in Florence, Italy. She was the youngest of five children and came from a wealthy family. Her parents wanted her to grow up to be a lady like them, but she wanted to be a nurse instead.

When Nightingale was young, she lived with her aunt in London and attended school there until 1825. Then she went to Germany where she studied nursing at Kaiserswerth Hospital near Düsseldorf (a city north of Cologne).

Florence Nightingale spent much of her youth traveling around Europe and Egypt with her family.

In 1851, Florence Nightingale decided to travel around Europe and Egypt with her family. During this time, she was educated by her mother in many different subjects including languages and art. She also became interested in science, politics and religion during these travels.

She was a very talented artist as well as being interested in science and politics at a young age. When she grew up she went on many more trips around Europe where she learned lots more about art and culture while also learning some languages such as German which helped her when working with soldiers later on who were from Germany.

Despite her parents wishes, she was determined to study nursing.

  • Despite her parents wishes, she was determined to study nursing.
  • She wanted to be a nurse because she wanted to help people.
  • She wanted to be a nurse because she wanted to see the world.
  • She wanted to be a nurse because she wanted to do something different.
  • She had a calling for nursing, and that’s what led her down this path

In 1850, she became the superintendent of a hospital called the Institution for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen in Distressed Circumstances.

In 1850, she became the superintendent of a hospital called the Institution for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen in Distressed Circumstances. She was responsible for everything that went on in this hospital: from doctors and nurses to staff and patients. This made her very important at this time in history because she was able to bring about change by using her skills as an administrator and manager.

In 1853, she received a letter from a woman asking for help in setting up a nursing school at London Hospital.

A woman writing to Florence Nightingale in 1853 asked for help in setting up a nursing school at London Hospital. The woman was Mrs. Elizabeth Gaskell, and she had been inspired by Nightingale’s work during the Crimean War.

In 1856, Nightingale established St. Thomas’ Training School for Nurses at King’s College Hospital on the corner of Gower Street and Charing Cross Road (pictured).

She developed a training program for nurses that included medical training as well as religious instruction.

She developed a training program for nurses that included medical training as well as religious instruction. She believed that education and religion were central to the proper care of patients.

At the age of 38, she went to Crimea during the Crimean War as a nurse and ended up saving lives.

At the age of 38, she went to Crimea during the Crimean War as a nurse and ended up saving lives. She was sent by the British government, who were concerned about their soldiers dying from disease or being injured on the battlefield. The only other person at that point who had tried to do something similar was Florence Nightingale’s mother, who had also been a pioneer in social services for women’s health care reform.

Although Florence wasn’t trained as either a doctor or soldier (or even particularly physically fit), she went to the front lines anyway because she wanted to help people who were injured there. She worked hard every day for two years until most illnesses were contained under control again—and then returned home where she continued her work improving conditions within hospitals so they could better treat patients with different illnesses without spreading infection while they recovered.”

After returning from Crimea she wrote about her experience and made suggestions for changes that needed to be made in understanding what patients needed and how they could be cared for more efficiently.

Florence Nightingale wrote three books about her experiences in Crimea: Notes on Nursing, Notes on Hospitals, and Notes on Sanitary Matters. She also wrote a book called Notes on Matters Affecting the Health, Efficiency and Hospital Administration of the British Army.

In these books she talked about what she had seen during the Crimean War, what was needed to keep patients safe and healthy while they were in hospital and how hospitals could improve their services so that more soldiers could be saved.

While staying at home after Crimea, she wrote books about public health, hospitals, and nursing.

While staying at home after Crimea, she wrote books about public health, hospitals and nursing. She was a pioneer in the field of public health and nursing. She was also a pioneer in the field of hospitals. She also wrote a book on public health nursing.

Florence Nightingale did not become who people wanted her to be, instead she spent her life helping others.

Florence Nightingale was born in 1820 in Italy to wealthy parents. Her family was part of the upper class, but they didn’t have as much money as some other families with similar titles. Florence’s father wanted her to become a lady who would marry into another wealthy family and have children. However, Florence had other plans for herself—she wanted to become an educated woman who could make her own choices about what she did with her life.

To accomplish this goal, Florence Nightingale enrolled at a boarding school when she was thirteen years old. The school taught students how to read and write, but it also focused on teaching young ladies how to be proper wives and mothers by focusing on etiquette, manners, dressmaking skills (making sure dresses fit properly), cooking (making meals suitable for men) and sewing skills (sewing clothes).

Florence hated every minute of being there! She hated learning these women’s skills because they seemed pointless compared with what she really wanted—education! So she ran away from home when she turned seventeen years old because her parents wouldn’t let her go back to school after graduating from boarding school.”

Florence Nightingale was a woman who did not let anyone tell her what she should or shouldn’t do. She made a difference in the world through her nursing and social reform work.