Pneumonia Nursing Intervention

Pneumonia Nursing Intervention

Nursing intervention is important in nursing care of clients with pneumonia.

Atypical pneumonia: azithromycin, clarithromycin Bactrim DS, cefuroxime axetil

Azithromycin, clarithromycin Bactrim DS, and cefuroxime axetil are alternatives to penicillin for atypical pneumonia.

If you’re considering using one of these medications to treat your patient’s pneumonia, you should familiarize yourself with its side effects and rationale for use.

Community acquired pneumonia: levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, imipenem-cilastatin (Primaxin), ampicillin-sulbactam (Unasyn)

  • Levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and imipenem-cilastatin (Primaxin) are used for community acquired pneumonia.
  • Ampicillin-sulbactam (Unasyn) is also a good option for community acquired pneumonia as it has activity against Gram-positive organisms.

Hospital acquired pneumonia (nosocomial): Tazocin (pipercillin/tazobactam), Imipenem/cilastin or meropenem or doripenem, Zosyn (piperacillin/tazobactam), Primaxin IM (imipenem and cilastatin)

  • Tazocin (pipercillin/tazobactam), Imipenem/cilastin or meropenem or doripenem, Zosyn (piperacillin/tazobactam), Primaxin IM (imipenem and cilastatin)

The choice of antibiotics depends on the type of bacteria causing pneumonia. If you’re treating a patient with hospital-acquired pneumonia, you may also need to use an antibiotic that targets specific types of bacteria.

Provide supplemental oxygen via nasal cannula.

Supplemental oxygen is used to relieve dyspnea and fatigue, as well as hypoxia and hypoxemia. Oxygen administration is helpful for patients with pneumonia because it relieves the work of breathing by reducing workload on the respiratory system. Oxygen helps patients by improving gas exchange in the alveoli, decreasing pulmonary hypertension and improving cardiac output, which improves tissue perfusion.

Increase I&O to 100 to 150 ml/hr or administer diuretics as prescribed.

Increased I&O

• Increase I&O to 100 to 150 ml/hr or administer diuretics as prescribed.

• Remove insensible losses by increasing humidity and elevating the head of the bed.

Clear secretions effectively by encouraging deep breathing and chest physiotherapy.

  • Chest physiotherapy involves the manual manipulation of the chest and lungs to loosen secretions and promote their removal.
  • Deep breathing helps clear mucus from the airways, which improves oxygenation.
  • Suctioning removes secretions from an open airway, allowing you to breathe more easily. Postural drainage helps remove secretions by positioning your body in a way that promotes drainage into the lungs, thus improving oxygenation and reducing infection risk. Manual removal of secretions is similar to suctioning but may be used if suction equipment is unavailable or if there’s no suitable opening for suction catheters (such as when there’s an injury).

Monitor for cor pulmonale by measuring blood pressure of legs, feet and ankles.

  • Measure blood pressure of legs, feet and ankles every 4 hours
  • If systolic blood pressure is greater than 130 or diastolic blood pressure is greater than 85, notify the physician

Nursing intervention is important in nursing care of clients with pneumonia

Nursing intervention is important in nursing care of clients with pneumonia. Nursing interventions are actions or decisions made by nurses to address client needs. There are several nursing interventions that can be used to help a patient who has developed pneumonia.

These include:

  • Positioning correctly – as this will ensure that the patient’s lungs have room to expand and contract properly, helping them get enough oxygen into their blood stream
  • Assisting with breathing exercises – these can help keep their lungs open and prevent the creation of mucus which will make it harder for them to breathe normally

In conclusion, nursing intervention is a very important part of the nursing care of clients with pneumonia.

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