Registered Nursing Definition

Registered Nursing Definition

Registered nursing, or RN, is one of the most common nursing careers. Registered nurses work in a variety of settings including hospitals, long-term care facilities, home health settings, private practices and public health facilities such as community clinics or public schools. They may also provide care at school-based clinics and other locations where they are needed. The goal of this article is to explain what it takes to become an RN, what the job entails and how much it pays (all good things!).

Registered nursing (RN) is a nursing career that involves assessment, treatment and care for patients through the use of technology, medications and holistic practices. RNs typically work alongside doctors and other healthcare professionals to provide comprehensive care for patients.

Registered nurses (RNs) are registered professionals who help provide comprehensive care to patients. RNs work with doctors, physician’s assistants and other healthcare professionals to assess, treat and care for patients. They use technology, medications and holistic practices to do this.

RNs work in a variety of healthcare settings including hospitals, rehab centers, nursing homes and hospice care programs.

Registered nurses may practice in hospitals, long-term care facilities, home health settings, private practices or public health facilities such as community clinics or public schools.

Registered nurses (RNs) may practice in hospitals, long-term care facilities, home health settings, private practices or public health facilities such as community clinics or public schools.

Being an RN is a wide-open field that can include a wide variety of healthcare settings.

Being an RN is a wide-open field that can include a wide variety of healthcare settings.

  • You can work in hospitals, long-term care facilities, home health settings, private practices or public health facilities such as community clinics or public schools.
  • Each setting requires different skills and responsibilities. For example:
  • Hospitals are large institutions where RNs provide direct patient care (which could include taking vital signs, checking medications, monitoring IVs) and administer treatments ordered by doctors under their supervision. They also educate patients and their families on how to take care of themselves at home when they leave the hospital after an illness or surgery recovery period has been completed there; they refer patients who need other services like physical therapy back into the system; they coordinate with other departments within the hospital (such as radiology) to make sure each person receives appropriate treatment for whatever issues brought him/her into the ER initially

As you can see, being an RN is a wide-open field that can include a wide variety of healthcare settings. If you’re interested in becoming an RN and want to learn more about how it works, contact your local community college or university nursing program.

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