Travel Nursing Housing Sites

Travel Nursing Housing Sites

Moving to a new place is exciting, but it can also be stressful. Finding the right housing site, getting settled in and finding your new rhythm often feels like an overwhelming task. So how do you make sure that moving to a new city doesn’t turn into a nightmare? By doing your research and being prepared for what’s ahead! There are several things you can do before committing to any particular site or neighborhood:

Tip #1: You can negotiate with the site you choose.

As a traveler, you have the option to negotiate with the housing site you choose. If a room or apartment is listed at $500 per month and you decide it’s worth $400 per month, that’s what they’ll charge if they agree to let you live there.

A few more tips:

  • Don’t be afraid to ask for a discount on your first month or two of rent—the worst they can say is no (and even then, there are still options).
  • Be wary of any sites where the rates are unbelievably low—it might mean that something isn’t right about your living situation!
  • Free housing is pretty rare in this industry, but if it’s available on a reputable site (such as [HousingHelpers](https://www.housinghelpers.com)) then definitely take advantage of it!

Tip #2: Food and beverage costs are tax-free until you’ve been in your new location for 30 days.

In the United States, food and beverage costs are tax-free until you’ve been in your new location for 30 days. This means that if you’re staying at a hotel that has a restaurant, you don’t have to pay taxes on the meals they provide while at that location. However, if you choose to eat out in town instead, then those meals are subject to sales tax (and sometimes other fees).

Tip #3: Try to get your housing site on a month-to-month agreement.

In most cases, it’s better for a travel nurse to be on a month-to-month agreement. For example, if you’re new to the area and aren’t sure how long you’ll be there, or if your employer hasn’t been able to secure housing for next month yet (in which case they may have already requested that landlords hold the unit until their arrival).

With this type of agreement, when someone moves out of your place after one month instead of three months (or even six!), it doesn’t mean that they’ve left because they’re unhappy with their surroundings. They just might want more space or want to explore different options before making a decision on where they’d like to live full time. This can be easier than having them leave early because they weren’t happy with something at your house—it’s not as personal!

Tip #4: Be careful of the “hidden fees.”

Before you sign a lease, make sure to do the necessary research. The best way is through the Internet. Search for previous tenants and ask them questions about their experiences with housing in your area. You can also go directly to rental offices and see if they have any advice or tips for you on where to stay or what type of housing would be best suited for your needs.

A potential issue that comes up when choosing between different types of housing options is hidden fees, which include cleaning fees, utility fees, damage deposits and pet fees among others. Knowing these upfront will help ensure you aren’t surprised by an unexpected expense when it comes time for your move-in day!

Tip #5: Make sure your basic needs are met before you arrive.

  • Make sure you have access to a kitchen.
  • Make sure you can do laundry.
  • Make sure that the place has a washer and dryer, or at the very least, an inexpensive laundromat nearby. The last thing you want is to be stuck with dirty clothes while you’re away from home!
  • Make sure there’s a refrigerator in your apartment – nothing worse than being hungry and having nowhere to buy food!
  • If possible, make sure there is also a stove available so that you can cook meals yourself rather than having everything delivered every day (which gets expensive).

Tip #6: Look for housing sites that offer discounts to travelers.

  • Look for housing sites that offer discounts to traveling healthcare workers.

Many of these sites offer discounts on housing and other expenses. The largest one we found was $50 off your first month’s rent, but there were others that offered smaller incentives as well as discounts on utilities and food, transportation costs, entertainment and activities like movie tickets and museum admission. Some even included free visits to local doctors and dentists for annual checkups or basic care needs like teeth cleaning or checkups with a chiropractor.

Tip #7: Get a travel friend!

Tip #7: Get a travel friend!

It is always nice to have someone you can share the experience with. Having a travel companion can help you feel more comfortable and safe, especially if you are new to the area. You can give each other advice on where to go and what to do in your free time, and it’s also nice to have someone else there for support when things go wrong. Traveling with friends will make sure that both of you get the most out of your trip—you can split costs like rental cars or hotel rooms, so everyone gets their own room (or suite) at night!

Tip #8: Make sure you’re checking out each neighborhood you’re considering in person before making a decision.

Look at the neighborhood in person before making a decision.

The best way to see if you’ll like a neighborhood is by visiting it in person. You’re looking for areas that have things you enjoy doing, or want to do, and plenty of restaurants, stores, and other businesses that can help you get what you need when you need it.

  • Look at the neighborhood during different times of day—morning rush hour versus evening rush hour; on Saturdays versus Sundays; when schools are open versus when they’re closed (if applicable).
  • Look at the neighborhood during different seasons: winter vs summer; spring vs fall; rainy season vs dry season (if known). Are there trees? Parks? Is there enough space between houses so that people can breathe? Are there sidewalks or trails where people walk dogs regularly? Is there an option for public transportation nearby (buses/railroads)? Does traffic flow smoothly through streets without clogging up intersections intermittently throughout the day?

Tip #9: Don’t forget to ask other nurses who’ve worked there before what their experience was like.

When you’re looking for a housing site, it can be helpful to ask other nurses who’ve worked there before what their experience was like.

  • Ask for references. If the home is listed with a company that has an online directory, look up the reviews given by past tenants.
  • Ask for reviews on Google and Yelp as well; these may not be as detailed, but it might give you an idea of what people thought about their experiences at the property.
  • Ask if photos are available of other tenants’ homes or apartments (even if they were taken several years ago). This will give you an idea of what kinds of accommodations are offered at this facility and how they look in person.

These things will help ensure that your new home suits your needs!

Tip #10: Take a look at the average cost in your new city with a cost of living calculator, so that you know what prices are reasonable for housing.

  • Cost of living calculators are a good way to figure out how much you can afford to pay for housing.
  • There are many different cost of living calculators online, with varying levels of complexity and detail.
  • Take a look at this example from Expatistan, which is one of the most popular tools on the internet for figuring out housing prices in new cities: https://www.expatistan.com/#!cost-of-living-calculator/. This calculator will give you an idea of what prices are reasonable for your desired location, so that you aren’t paying too much or too little for what you need.

You can negotiate with the site you choose and make sure to look for discounts before agreeing to anything

Negotiate with the site you choose and make sure to look for discounts before agreeing to anything. Check out the average cost in your new city with a cost of living calculator, such as Numbeo, before you arrive. Make sure your basic needs are met before you arrive at any housing location, so that no one will be surprised or disappointed by what they find when they get there. Look for housing sites that offer discounts to travelers, such as Airbnb’s Superhost program (which requires hosts select their listing).

There are many sites that offer housing for travelers, each with their own pros and cons. It is up to you to decide which one is best for you and your situation. Remember that there are no guarantees when it comes to travel nursing, but if you take these tips into consideration when searching for housing, then hopefully your experience will be just as successful as mine!

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