Hypertension Care Plan Nursing

Hypertension Care Plan Nursing

Hypertension is also known as high blood pressure. Hypertension is a condition where the pressure of the blood in the arteries is persistently elevated. It is one of the most common chronic medical conditions. Common symptoms include headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, shortness of breath and nose bleeds. More serious complications include heart failure, stroke or kidney failure

Hypertension is also known as high blood pressure.

Hypertension is also known as high blood pressure. It is a chronic medical condition that affects about one in every three adults in the United States.

Blood pressure is the force of your blood against the walls of your arteries as it pumps through your body. Blood pressure readings are measured as two numbers: systolic and diastolic. The top number, called the systolic blood pressure, reflects how hard your heart beats when it pumps out its first beat after resting or sleeping (your heart rate increases while you’re awake). The lower number, called diastolic blood pressure, reflects how hard your heart beats between beats while pumping oxygen-rich blood throughout your body (your heart rate decreases while you’re awake).

Hypertension is a condition where the pressure of the blood in the arteries is persistently elevated.

Hypertension is a condition where the pressure of the blood in the arteries is persistently elevated. High blood pressure readings mean that your heart has to work harder to pump blood through your body. This can lead to damage and disease over time, including heart attacks and strokes. High blood pressure is usually called the “silent killer” because it does not cause symptoms until serious damage has been done.

It is one of the most common chronic medical conditions.

Hypertension is one of the most common chronic medical conditions. It occurs when blood pressure levels are higher than normal, which can lead to stroke, heart disease and other long-term health problems. Researchers estimate that nearly 1 billion people around the world suffer from hypertension.

Hypertension can be treated through medication and lifestyle changes like diet and exercise. People who have this condition should visit their doctor regularly for checkups so that they can reduce their risk of complications down the line.

Common symptoms include headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, shortness of breath, palpitations and nose bleeds.

Common symptoms include headache, dizziness, lightheadedness, shortness of breath and palpitations. In some cases nose bleeds may occur.

Hypertension developed over a long period of time may not show any symptoms at all.

More serious complications include heart failure, stroke or kidney failure.

More serious complications include heart failure, stroke or kidney failure.

Heart failure is when the heart muscle is no longer able to pump enough blood to meet the body’s demands. The most common cause of heart failure is high blood pressure. About half of all people with high blood pressure will eventually develop some degree of heart failure.

Stroke occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery in your brain or breaks off and travels through your bloodstream until it blocks a smaller artery in another part of your body (such as the brainstem). This type of stroke can be fatal if not treated immediately by EMS personnel who perform CPR and administer medications. In addition, patients may experience temporary paralysis (or loss of sensation) on one side of their body due to nerve damage caused by reduced blood flow through arteries leading into these areas.*

Causes:

Hypertension is a condition that occurs when the arteries carrying blood to your heart and brain are narrowed, which makes it more difficult for blood to pass through. The narrowing of these arteries can lead to high blood pressure and an increased risk for stroke, heart attack and kidney failure.

Many things can lead to hypertension, such as family history of high blood pressure or diabetes; being overweight; smoking cigarettes; drinking too much alcohol; stress

Too much salt can cause hypertension.

Sodium is a mineral that the body needs for proper function. Sodium helps the body maintain fluid balance and can be found in table salt, processed foods and salt substitutes. The average American consumes 4,000 mg of sodium each day (about 2 teaspoons), while the recommended daily amount is 1,500 mg/day. However, most people consume more than they need on a daily basis. Foods high in sodium include pizza, soup and sandwiches made with deli meats such as salami or ham; canned foods like soups and vegetables; frozen dinners; potato chips; pretzels; crackers and snack mixes that contain pretzels or chips; fast food items like burgers or hot dogs served with fries instead of onion rings or coleslaw if they aren’t baked ones instead of fried ones because they are healthier options at places like McDonald’s–this type of place has healthy alternatives but it’s up to individuals whether

– Excessive alcohol consumption can cause hypertension.

You should avoid excessive alcohol consumption if you have hypertension. Alcohol can cause the blood pressure to rise, which can lead to complications. Research has shown that even moderate amounts of alcohol may increase the risk of heart disease and stroke in people with hypertension.

  • Blood pressure is increased when you drink too much alcohol. This can result in damage to the arteries, high blood cholesterol levels, organ damage (including the heart) and stroke.
  • Alcohol causes your heart rate to increase within 15 minutes after drinking it; this effect lasts for 2-3 hours after drinking stops. Drinking too much alcohol over time may damage your heart muscle or cause it to enlarge (cardiomyopathy). Excessive drinking also causes irregular heartbeat (arrhythmia), which increases your risk of sudden death due to a cardiac event such as a heart attack or stroke

– Obesity can cause hypertension.

Obesity can cause hypertension by increasing the risk of diabetes, heart disease, and kidney disease. In addition to these health problems, obesity can cause hypertension by increasing blood pressure.

– Some medications (particularly over the counter medications) can cause hypertension.

Some medications can cause hypertension. Some of these are over-the-counter medications, such as NSAIDs and diuretics, while others are prescription drugs.

Over-the-counter medications that can cause hypertension include:

  • NSAIDS (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) may block prostaglandins in the blood vessels and increase blood pressure. These include aspirin and ibuprofen (Advil), naproxen sodium (Aleve), ketoprofen (Orudis KT), indomethacin, diclofenac potassium tablets for oral suspension, meloxicam and tenoxicam (generic names).
  • ACE inhibitors can increase your risk of developing kidney problems if you take them with certain other drugs or have chronic kidney disease. If you’re taking an ACE inhibitor to treat high blood pressure or heart failure, talk with your doctor before using any over-the-counter medication containing acetaminophen or NSAIDS; this includes aspirin-free pain relievers like Motrin IB or Advil PM.
  • Beta blockers: These medicines reduce heart rate and lower blood pressure by blocking the effects of adrenaline on the heart muscle. The most common beta blockers used to treat high blood pressure include acebutolol hydrochloride under brand name Sectral®, atenolol hydrochloride under brand name Tenormin®

– Stress can cause hypertension.

Stress can cause hypertension in the long term.

Stress can also cause hypertension in the short term.

Stress can also cause hypertension in the middle term.

Hypertension is a serious condition that can lead to death. It is important that you seek treatment as soon as possible if you think you have this condition.

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