Nursing Appreciation Week 2021

Nursing Appreciation Week 2021

National Nurses Week is an annual celebration of the important role nurses have in society. It’s also a time to celebrate those who have dedicated their lives to nursing and helped us all through some of our most difficult times. This year, National Nurses Week begins on Monday, May 6 (also known as RN Recognition Day) and ends on Sunday, May 12, 2021. Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, is widely considered to be the mother of nursing. Today in the United States there are more than 3 million registered nurses working in a variety of settings and specialties—from emergency departments and intensive care units to operating rooms; from community health clinics to hospices; from schools and colleges all over America….

This year, National Nurses Week begins on Monday, May 6 (also known as RN Recognition Day) and ends on Sunday, May 12, 2021.

This year, National Nurses Week begins on Monday, May 6 (also known as RN Recognition Day) and ends on Sunday, May 12, 2021.

  • It runs for just over a week to celebrate the work that nurses do every day to care for others in their communities
  • There are many ways to recognize nurses: make a card or write a letter thanking your nurse for all they do
  • You could also give them flowers or candy – anything small will be appreciated by your favorite nurse!

Another way is through social media. You can use hashtags like #NurseAppreciationWeek or #RNRecognitionDay. You can also share photos of yourself with the hashtag so people can see how happy you are when meeting with your loved one’s favorite nurse!

National Nurses Week is an annual celebration of the important role nurses have in society.

Nurses are the most trusted profession in America, according to a Gallup poll. They are also the largest group of healthcare workers in America. Nurses outnumber doctors and other health professionals by nearly two million, according to statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

Nurses have long been known as compassionate caregivers who provide care for patients with compassion and expertise. However, did you know that they are also the most educated group of healthcare workers? According to BLS findings on nursing education levels here in America:

91% earned an associate degree or higher;

41% earned a bachelor’s degree; and

30% earned a master’s degree or higher

National Nurses Week began in 1954 with just one day of recognition.

National Nurses Week began in 1954 with just one day of recognition. It was a time to honor nurses and the work they do. As time went on, however, National Nurses Week became a week-long celebration. Today it’s held every May, but originally it was celebrated in late May or early June to coincide with Florence Nightingale’s birthday (May 12). In 1955, the American Nurses Association (ANA) produced the first official calendar for National Nurses Week. The calendar featured a different theme for each day of National Nurses Week: Day 1 was “Nurse Education,” Day 2 was “Nursing Education,” Day 3 was “Nurse Recruitment,” etc.

Florence Nightingale, the founder of modern nursing, is widely considered to be the mother of nursing.

The founder of modern nursing, Florence Nightingale, is widely considered to be the mother of nursing. She was a pioneer in the field of modern nursing and its methods. She was the first woman in England to receive a degree in midwifery and nursing, as well as being awarded a diploma from Kaiser-I-Hind at Lahore. The Crimean War saw her work for two years as a nurse at Scutari hospital, where she was responsible for improving sanitation and food supplies for wounded soldiers during wartime conditions.

Her efforts were recognized by Queen Victoria who granted her the title “Lady”. In recognition of her outstanding contributions to healthcare worldwide through advancements made during World War II (or WWII), she has been celebrated on several occasions including International Nurses Day on May 12th each year since 1966 when it was established by ANAOIMES (Association Nationale des Infirmières et Infirmiers de France).

Today in the United States, more than 3 million registered nurses are working in a variety of settings and specialties.

Today, more than 3 million registered nurses are working in a variety of settings and specialties throughout the U.S., and they comprise the largest group of nurses in the country. Registered nurses (RNs) also make up more than two-thirds of all practicing U.S. nurses, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS).

In fact, RNs make up just over half—53 percent—of practicing registered nurses worldwide, according to an analysis by GlobalData, a company that provides information on healthcare trends and markets globally. And on an international scale, RNs outweigh all other types of nursing professionals by a significant margin: In Canada alone there are almost as many registered nurse practitioners as there are licensed practical/vocational/health support workers; however LPN/LVNs only account for 7 percent of all employed nursing professionals in Canada while RNs represent 24 percent’

In honor of National Nurses Week, take some time to honor nurses everywhere.

In honor of National Nurses Week, take some time to honor nurses everywhere.

  • Visit a nursing home or hospital and thank the nurses for all they do.
  • Write a letter to your local newspaper telling them why you think having enough nurses is important.
  • Donate money to your local nursing school or donate blood if you’re able (and it’s allowed).
  • Write an article about nurses on your blog, or share an image on social media with #NursingAppreciationWeek2020 or #NursingAppreciationWeek2021 in the caption! (This tip is especially helpful if you’re not sure what else there is to do!)

It’s important to celebrate how much nurses do for us all!

Nursing appreciation week is a time for us to celebrate the people who care for us when we’re sick, injured and scared. They are the ones who make sure we have what we need to get well faster. They help us feel safe and secure during some of the most difficult times in our lives. Nurses are an important part of what makes our health care system work so well!

So, the next time you need a nurse, remember to say thank you. And if you’re a nurse reading this article, never forget your importance in our world!

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